The reported to the Norwegian authorities. Furthermore, it

The upbringing and adaptation towards technology in the 21st Century has generated a new field of atrocity. In this day and age, our society has become technology dependant, therefore resulting in a increased rate in cyber crime. Computers, have become the mainstay and core for several businesses and governments operations, making these establishments highly vulnerable to an attack, most recently, being the alleged cyber attacks conducted by the Russians on the 2016 US Presidential elections. However, various amounts of steps have been put into action, however, with technology constantly improving and changing, there is an increasing need for the precautions in which were put into place to change and evolve with it. Norway, a high income country, located in the continent of Europe, sharing its eastern border with the country Sweden itself has been subjected to cyber crime, according to norwaypost.no, “every second Norwegian business is exposed to computer crime”. However, these companies that are attacked over cyberspace, frequently don’t notice that they have been attacked, due to the fact that there have been only 361 incidences of cyber crime that have been reported to the Norwegian authorities. Furthermore, it is said that only one out of nine companies in Norway have a exhaustive plan of action against cyber crime. The Norwegian National Security Authority has released a statement explaining that cyber crime could result in a loss of 20 billion Norwegian krone for companies in the future. Norway has taken precautions such as by entering Europol, which is a European Law Enforcement agency, which provides its services namely counteracting cybercrime in all 28 EU states. The delegation of Norway has also established the NCD (Norwegian Cyber Defence) partnered with the Norwegian Special Forces, which has aided in several restorations in the technology of the Norwegians. Moreover, in September 2017, Norway announced that it would aim to cooperate with NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCD COE), which would allow for the delegation of Norway to be able to partake in international collaboration with allies and partners who are currently promoting and developing new ways to counteract digital crime, and to further comprehend the roles of international laws and how these specific laws can apply in cyberspace. By the end of the year 2018, it is said that the delegation of Norway is to be entered into the Centre of Excellence. Overall, the delegation of Norway believes that over the course of a short span of time, cyberspace has evolved and changed the overall global landscape in a positive and a negative way. However, if the right steps are put into place, this unsettling negative aspect of further enhancing technology could be prevented.