In the nature of tragedies. He especially wonders

In his poem “Out, out-“, Robert Frost explores the nature of tragedies. He especially wonders if Tragedies can happen at any time and are abrupt, but stated more as a possibility. In the poem “Out, out-“,  a boy who lives in Vermont is finished with his work for the day and his sister tells him that supper was ready, excited in a hurry he cut his hand. The boy needed his hand to be amputated but couldn’t accept and made a big ordeal not to. However when he was finally convinced to be amputated while he was under anesthesia passed away. Frost uses personification, imagery, and metaphors to show that Tragedies can happen at any time and are abrupt.First of all, Frost uses metaphors to express the idea that the idea tragedies are abrupt and can happen at any time. For example, in line 28 it says, “The doctor put him in the dark of ether.”This shows after being a bright happy day his world plunged into darkness in a matter of seconds.This furthermore suggests Frost’s message that of the abruptness of tragedies that can happen at any time.Second of all, Frost uses imagery to show that Tragedies can happen at any time and are sudden. In lines 5-6 of the poem it describes the scenery in the setting as “Five mountain ranges one behind the other under the sunset of Vermont.” This gives the reader a calm sensation only to be shattered by the event where the boy cut of his hand, which displays the abruptness of tragedies. Third of all, Frost uses personification to show that tragedies have a nature of being abrupt, sudden, and can happen at any moment. In line 1 it says, “The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard.” This makes the reader feel uncertain and suspenseful, but quickly disregard it until the boy cut his hand off. Robert Frost reminds us that, tragedies can happen at any time and are abrupt. As a result, readers better understand the nature of tragedies. Works CitedRobert Frost “Out, out-” Poetry Foundation. Web 23 Jannaraury 2018