In for enjoyment in other countries, Africans viewed

In
the 4th section of Part 2 in the book, The Ball is Round: A
Global History of Soccer, David Goldblatt explains about how football
started in Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, United States, and
Ireland. Goldblatt describes that it was difficult for football to successfully
spread in Canada because of the focus in other sports, such as ice hockey due
to the long winters. Therefore, football and cricket were mainly played in
elite schools and universities. On the other hand, New Zealand was influenced
by the exemplified rules of football, rugby union, rugby league, Australian
football, and Gaelic football (89). In addition, the first local football
association was established in Auckland in 1886. However, due to the
government’s intervention, football was played in small industrial districts,
particularly the mining towns in South Island.

            Through the British Army, football
and other sports took place in South Africa. Despite soccer being viewed as a
sport for enjoyment in other countries, Africans viewed soccer as a tool of
public association, expression, and method to show restrictions and frailty of
the colonizers, meaning that soccer was a way to free themselves from the hardships.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Contrarily, football reached Australia before the rules were established in
Britain. Thus, Australia created its own rules, which included rules that
preserved rules of handling or kicking the ball.

            In the United States, people in
elite schools and universities primarily played football. St. Louis was
significant because the football players represented the U.S. in the unofficial
tournament at the 1904 Olympic Games. Another crucial event in the U.S. history
of soccer was when the U.S. national team won the World Cup in Uruguay in 1930.

Moreover, in Ireland, the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) played a big role
in shaping sports even with the oppression of the Catholic hierarchy. The GAA
not only preserve and codify rules but also made its own rules to deprecate
British sport. However, there were conflicts between the GAA and hierarchy, so
football was accepted when the Irish national team won the World Cup.